Michael Gargiulo | Ash Moniz

June 6-27, 2015

ROY G BIV Gallery presents Michael Gargiulo and Ash Moniz. Class conflict comes to a head in Gargiulo’s photos and paintings. Globalization displaces national identity in Moniz’s site-specific performances.

 
 
 Michael Gargiulo,  Charbel , Lambda print, 2014

Michael Gargiulo, Charbel, Lambda print, 2014

Michael Gargiulo

Class conflict comes to a head in Gargiulo’s paintings and drawings. Inspired by his childhood in a declining Cleveland, Ohio, Gargiulo examines the discord that comes with a scarcity of opportunity. Gargiulo’s enamel paintings repeat class-based platitudes, e.g., “private property” and “whiteness,” to challenge their boundaries. His photographs document individuals bearing arms in an effort to protect their property. Gargiulo’s work examines economic inequality and asks: who is accountable?

Michael Gargiulo was born in 1991 in Cleveland, Ohio. He graduated in 2014 with a BFA in Drawing and Painting from The Ohio State University. Gargiulo has participated in the Fergus Scholarship Award Exhibition (OSU Urban Arts Space) and You Call That Art? (Columbus Cultural Arts Center)

 
 Ash Moniz,  Carry-On Allowance

Ash Moniz, Carry-On Allowance

Ash Moniz

Globalization displaces national identity in Moniz’s site-specific performances. Moniz will display video and photo documentation of his site-specific performances, performed around the world. In Temple Swap, Moniz takes a section of a demolished Buddhist temple from China and attaches it to an imitation temple built in the Sahara Desert for Martin Scorsese’s film Kundun. Moniz’s work also dissects the mechanics of movement. In Carry-On Allowance, Moniz tests the flight carry-on weight limit by carrying 10 kg in actual dumbbell plates.

Ash Moniz was born in 1992 in Wawa, Canada, and has lived in Australia, United Arab Emirates, Morocco, China, and Canada. He has exhibited internationally in museums, galleries, and artist-run centers. He is the founder of an international residency/exhibition project in Morocco and is the assistant curator for the NUA Museum in Nanjing, China.

Review

“…Gargiulo’s show implicates the position of an individual within society concerning class structure and property. Moniz’s show employs humor to investigate an individual’s placement, movement, and relation to globalization. Together the two shows prompt the re-thinking of everyday issues in a not-so-everday way. Leaving the gallery this month, viewers find themselves reconsidering their placement within society on a personal, local, and global scale.”