#ROYasks HOME

 
Todd Jones,  Homesick , 2018, backer board, grout, tile & canvas on stretcher bars

Todd Jones, Homesick, 2018, backer board, grout, tile & canvas on stretcher bars

 
Alyssa Johnson,  Foundations , 2015, acrylic on canvas

Alyssa Johnson, Foundations, 2015, acrylic on canvas

 
 
 
 
 
 
Christabel & Samuel Wagner,  Structural Circumstance   E.G.2 , 2017

Christabel & Samuel Wagner, Structural Circumstance E.G.2, 2017

 

Todd Jones

ROY: What medium(s) do you work with and why?

TJ: My artwork takes an investigational approach to nontraditional materials, manipulating them to gain a better understanding of their limitations. As a process-driven artist, I view my artistic practice as scientific experimentation.

ROY: How does your work address the theme of the show?

TJ: The materials in the work are materials from my childhood home in Florida. I collected the raw materials and brought them to my move to the Midwest. Once in the Midwest, I began to become homesick. While growing up, I wanted nothing more than to move from my hometown. Now that I moved I appreciate the childhood memories and find comfort in the materials.

ROY: Who/what are some of your biggest influences or inspirations?

TJ: Construction materials and how personal memory creates a place out of the space heavily influence me.

ROY: What kinds of interactions do you hope to foster between your work and the viewer?

TJ: I hope the viewer fosters memories of home while studying the materials.

 

AJS

ROY: What medium(s) do you work with and why?

AJS: Because I approach my practice as a mode of inquiry, I am a multi-disciplinary artist working with paint, drawing materials, fibers, ceramics. I choose the medium as it exists in conversation with the proposed research question. 

ROY: How does your work address the theme of the show?

AJS: This work addresses experiences that resulted in the loss of permanence in my understanding of the word home. This painting came from a place of hurt, but more than that it come from a place of recognition for an internal battle in a loved one that I may never understand. 

ROY: What kinds of interactions do you hope to foster between your work and the viewer?

AJS: While the imagery is autobiographical, the message these paintings share is one that speaks to many who are hurt by the actions of persons important to them as well as those who fail to understand a concrete meaning of home. Much like I am unable to grasp a solid definition of home, the viewer of this painting has no access to the front door which has been barricaded by the porches of my child homes.  

 

Christabel & Samuel Wagner

ROY: What medium(s) do you work with and why?

CSW: We primarily work with plexiglass when collaborating with each other. Christabel is generally a painter and Sam is more liberal with his choice of mediums. We use colored plexi for its sheer vibrancy and voice, we love its bold reaction to light and how spiritual that feels. Also, the ability to always see every side and angle of the structure adds a certain confusion and depth that signals past, or a further development to ideas of stained glass that our work clearly reference.

ROY: How does your work address the theme of the show?

CSW: The structures that we inhabit are matters of our circumstance. It's a bit like the chicken or the egg. Did our circumstances lead us to live here, or because we live here we are of this circumstance? The model potentially questions and bucks expectations. It can live in a free space where its environment and context is ambiguous. While the photograph roots it in reality, full of inequality, hope, and disappointment. All of those bits and pieces are part of having a space that one calls home. Mixed emotions.

ROY: Who/what are some of your biggest influences or inspirations?

CSW: Collectively I’d say James Turrell for his ambiguous use of light and spirituality.

ROY: What kinds of interactions do you hope to foster between your work and the viewer?

CSW: A bit of a chuckle, and wonder at beauty and absurdity. Foremost we want an audience to ask questions of their own minds. Is our idea of inclusivity inclusive enough? Could we see beauty in cast off things, and people that maybe aren’t in line with our desires for people? Rural America is not cool or interesting to talk about in they way, potentially, other oppressed and impoverished peoples are. Maybe for a brief time this engages the rural, reflects them into a space filled with individuals that usually wouldn’t think of their lives, and think of them not as they are but what they could be. Something we don’t afford enough people the luxury of.

 
 
Kira Keck,  Second Base/Your Grandparents’ Basement , 2015, handwoven cotton and wool.

Kira Keck, Second Base/Your Grandparents’ Basement, 2015, handwoven cotton and wool.

 

Kira Keck

KK: I am deeply invested in textile structures, most often working with hand-weaving and embroidery. The fully embodied experience of creating cloth as well as the underlying geometry of structure informs my work. I also reference the history of craft, modernist design, the history of the fiber arts movement, and 70s handicraft books. I use this language of making to explore the logic and confusion of my experiences with cloth and self-imposed systems. Consuming media as a child, laying on the floor of my grandmother's house, irreversibly linked the tactile sensation of matted gold shag carpet with images of teenagers canoodling. In this piece I was meditating on an imagined past where I had succumbed to compulsory heterosexuality, using the visual language of the sexual revolution.

ROY: What medium(s) do you work with and why?

KK: [I am] compelled by textile structures. [I] love grids and squares, perhaps too much, [and I] like to touch things.

ROY: How does your work address the theme of the show?

KK: [My work] references interior design, formative years in vaguely oppressive familial households, and what it’s like when your only examples of relationships come from media and dysfunctional marriages.

ROY: Who/what are some of your biggest influences or inspirations?

KK: “Burt Reynolds reclining on a rug woven by Anni Albers”, queer and feminist theory, fiber arts pioneers such as Sonia Delaunay, and making things that are both erotic and profoundly unsexy.

ROY: What kinds of interactions do you hope to foster between your work and the viewer?

KK: A confusing mix of visual interest and tactile revulsion, anachronistic signifiers, and [to] spark joy.

 
Kelly McKenna,  Vessel , 2019, cardboard, post card, mod podge, shellac NFS. Commissioned piece available upon contacting artist.

Kelly McKenna, Vessel, 2019, cardboard, post card, mod podge, shellac NFS. Commissioned piece available upon contacting artist.

Kelly McKenna

ROY: What medium do you work with and why?

KM: I work mostly with ink, acrylic paint, pastels, colored pencils, old magazines, and found objects. I just like to make things. The materials I work with are what comes most easily to me. I get a lot of free magazines, postcards, and books from my parents who are avid auction-goers. I work at a company that has a lot of leftover pallets that I can use to build things with. Acrylic, pencils, and pastels are relatively cheap to come by, especially at auctions. I consider myself extremely resourceful. I use what I have, or what I can get cheaply. I prefer to spend time instead of money.

ROY: How does your work address the theme of the show?

KM: My piece is built out of postcards my Mom got for me at an estate sale. I believe every person is a vessel. We carry our physical, mental and emotional selves and navigate the world around us. These postcards are small representations of those vessels brought together as one. What we carry with us is a collection of the things we’ve decided to harbor and the things we have decided to send away. As vessels, we are our own homes. We let people in, we keep them out. We build walls, get caught in storms, we decay. This piece is representative of the parts of people’s homes/selves they chose to send away.

ROY: Who/what are some of your biggest influences/inspirations?

KM: This piece in particular is inspired by the poem To The Harbormaster by Frank O’Hara. I’m not a talented writer, so when I read something that profoundly states a feeling or idea I didn’t know how to express in words, I immediately want to make art out of it. I love the fiction writing of Jesse Ball as well. I make are to process my emotions and the world around me. So, in a way, all my external experiences are my inspiration.

ROY: What kinds of interactions do you hope to foster between your work and the viewer?

KM: I’d like to hear people talk about the things they carry as vessels and how they define their body as their home. What are the things you send away on a daily basis? Where do you see them going? Do you even identify as a home, or is your identity defined in another way?